Philosophers, mystics, environmentalist, visionaries and quantum physicists.  What’s the common denominator here? – they all teach the concept of ‘we are all one’.  In other words, we may look like individuals, but we are connected in ways we previously couldn’t imagine.

This complex topic, previously the exclusive terrain of intellectuals, who can demonstrate the interdependence of structures at a molecular level, is currently being played out in real terms. We can now witness the way stuff we do affects other people across the globe.


Our toxic waste, their acid rain…their toxic debt, our higher taxes. You get the picture.

But these weren’t ‘our’ choices, they were the choices of industrialists and bankers, so let’s look at some choices a little closer to home.

We want fast food…oops there goes the rainforest. We want cheap consumer goods…oops we’ve created child labour and sweatshops. Now that we understand cause and effect we can no longer play the bullied kid in the playground bleating “The market forced me to do it”.

Because ‘we’ are that market.  We need to become more aware of ourselves as a market force.

Business is now waking up to the fact that ‘caring and sharing’ is the new USP.  You’d have to search far and wide to find a mission statement or corporate vision that doesn’t include the word ‘integrity’.  Big business is into holism…big time.

So all good?

No! – just as business stepped up, ‘consciousness’ stepped up even higher and dropped a smoldering cigarette butt onto the kindling of its new platform.

Now it seems, it doesn’t matter what we ‘say’ – that’s all ‘spin’ – it’s what we ‘think’ that determines the outcome. Our intentions are the new market forces.  This is a big problem and one ‘we’ need to solve before ‘we’ burn out (literally and symbolically).

It’s a problem because, if we’re really honest, we don’t care about other people.  We care about ourselves foremost, and a handful of other people if we’re lucky enough to have some friends and family left who still give a damn.We hide behind lofty principles, feigned interest, heroic mission statements and self righteous concern.

We might fool a few people who are ‘just like us’ but do you really think we managed to scam ‘consciousness’ (the clue is in the word).

Here’s an example of how hilarious we are…

We totally buy into ‘the love thing’.  We are inspired by Masaru Emoto’s experiments with water crystalshttp://bit.ly/duX9vD. For anyone who hasn’t seen these, they document the results of focusing ‘messages of love’ onto polluted water – it actually changes the composition, purifying the water.

Does this mean we believe in the power of love?

No! – let’s have a look at the evidence.

In the western world we have perfectly adequate drinking water…it comes out of a tap. We don’t have to walk 5 miles to the source, or carry heavy pots of it home, only to find it full of deadly bacteria. So what do we do – rejoice in our good fortune?  No, we buy bottled water to drink (because we’re worth it).

Have we really thought about what this costs, both financially and environmentally.  Worldwide it’s a $100 billion industry.  Americans spend more on bottled water than iPods (24% of which is tap water repackaged by Coke and Pepsi).  38 billion plastic bottles go into landfills, even more go into the sea and get washed up or float like toxic islands destroying wildlife (Google the images and it’s impossible not to feel shocked). And then there’s the added cost of distributing all those bottles – thousands of planes, trains and automobiles spewing out more toxic waste.

From ‘I’ to ‘We’ – the baby steps.

  1. Get some empty glass bottles.
  2. Fill with tap water.
  3. Send thoughts of love.
  4. Drink as normal.


Because every time we buy a plastic bottle of water we’re saying ‘the love thing’ doesn’t work.  We’re admitting that we’re just a bunch of fraudulent muggles masquerading as highly conscious beings.

Sharpen the Harry Potter skills, save the planet and spend the money on something better…like an iPod.

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